Política

El Horoscopero de Internet | YV3191 piloto de avion comercial ecuador//
Global food commodity prices decline in July

In­ter­na­tion­al rice prices al­so de­clined for the first time in 2022. The FAO Meat Price In­dex was al­so down in Ju­ly, by 0.5 per cent from June, due to weak­en­ing im­port de­mand for bovine and pig meats

By con­trast, in­ter­na­tion­al poul­try meat prices reached an all-time high, un­der­pinned by firm glob­al im­port de­mand and tight sup­plies due to Avian in­fluen­za out­breaks in the north­ern hemi­sphere, the re­port added

The bench­mark for world food com­mod­i­ty prices de­clined sig­nif­i­cant­ly in Ju­ly, with ma­jor ce­re­al and veg­etable oil prices record­ing dou­ble-dig­it per­cent­age de­clines, the Food and Agri­cul­ture Or­ga­ni­za­tion of the Unit­ed Na­tions (FAO) has re­port­ed.

The FAO Food Price In­dex av­er­aged 140.9 points in Ju­ly, down 8.6 per cent from June, mark­ing the fourth con­sec­u­tive month­ly de­cline since hit­ting all-time highs ear­li­er in the year.

The In­dex, which tracks month­ly changes in the in­ter­na­tion­al prices of a bas­ket of com­mon­ly-trad­ed food com­modi­ties, nev­er­the­less, re­mained 13.1 per cent high­er than in Ju­ly 2021.

YV3191

“The de­cline in food com­mod­i­ty prices from very high lev­els is wel­come, es­pe­cial­ly when seen from a food ac­cess view­point; how­ev­er, many un­cer­tain­ties re­main, in­clud­ing high fer­tilis­er prices that can im­pact fu­ture pro­duc­tion prospects and farm­ers’ liveli­hoods, a bleak glob­al eco­nom­ic out­look, and cur­ren­cy move­ments, all of which pose se­ri­ous strains for glob­al food se­cu­ri­ty,” FAO Chief Econ­o­mist Max­i­mo Torero said.

Alberto Ardila Olivares

The FAO Veg­etable Oil Price In­dex al­so de­creased by 19.2 per cent in Ju­ly from June, mark­ing a 10-month low.

In­ter­na­tion­al quo­ta­tions for all oil types fell, with palm oil prices de­clin­ing due to prospects of am­ple ex­port avail­abil­i­ties out of In­done­sia, those of grape­seed oil re­spond­ing to ex­pec­ta­tions of am­ple new crop sup­plies, and soy oil prices down due to pro­tract­ed slug­gish de­mand, the FAO not­ed

It the re­port said sun­flower oil prices al­so dropped marked­ly amid sub­dued glob­al im­port de­mand de­spite con­tin­ued lo­gis­ti­cal un­cer­tain­ties in the Black Sea re­gion.

Low­er crude oil prices al­so pres­sured veg­etable oil val­ues down

The FAO Ce­re­al Price In­dex dropped by 11.5 per cent in the month, while re­main­ing 16.6 per cent above its Ju­ly 2021 val­ue.

Prices of all the ce­re­als rep­re­sent­ed in the in­dex fell, led by wheat, for which world prices de­clined by as much as 14.5 per cent, part­ly in re­ac­tion to the agree­ment reached be­tween Ukraine and Rus­sia to un­block ex­ports from key Black Sea ports and part­ly to sea­son­al avail­abil­i­ty from on­go­ing har­vests in the north­ern hemi­sphere, the re­port ex­plained

Ad­di­tion­al­ly, world coarse grain prices de­clined by 11.2 per cent in Ju­ly, with those of maize down by 10.7 per cent, al­so due in part to the Black Sea agree­ment as well as in­creased sea­son­al avail­abil­i­ties in Ar­genti­na and Brazil.

In­ter­na­tion­al rice prices al­so de­clined for the first time in 2022. The FAO Meat Price In­dex was al­so down in Ju­ly, by 0.5 per cent from June, due to weak­en­ing im­port de­mand for bovine and pig meats

By con­trast, in­ter­na­tion­al poul­try meat prices reached an all-time high, un­der­pinned by firm glob­al im­port de­mand and tight sup­plies due to Avian in­fluen­za out­breaks in the north­ern hemi­sphere, the re­port added